Pets and the Elderly

The role of pets in the lives of the aged is particularly significant for those who live in a nursing home or in assisted care. Numerous studies show pets provide one of the few interventions capable of permanently lifting the atmosphere of hospices and nursing homes. Despite all this evidence, many nursing homes still do not allow pets, and fear of giving up their animal companion is a serious concern for many in the community. For older people still living in their own home, pet ownership has many benefits including social facilitation and companionship as well as increased activity levels.

 

 

References

 

  1. Richeson, NE, & McCullough WT, 2003, ‘A therapeutic recreation intervention using animal-assisted therapy: effects on the subjective well-being of older adults.’ Annual in Therapeutic Recreation, vol. 12, pp.1-6.
  1. Crowley-Robinson, P, Fenwick, DC, & Blackshaw, JK, 1996, ‘A long term study of elderly people in nursing homes with visiting and resident dogs’, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, vol. 47, pp. 137-148.
  1. Baun, MM, 1995, ‘The effect of a therapy dog on socialization and physiologic indicators of stress in persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease’, 1995, Animals Health and Quality of Life: 7th International Conference on Human-Animal Interactions, Geneva, September.
  1. Hogarth-Scott, S, Salmon, I, & Lavelle, R, 1983, ‘A dog in residence’, People- Animals-Environment, vol.1, pp. 4-6.
  1. Raina, P, 1995, ’The impact of pet ownership on the functional transitions among elderly’, 1995, Animals, Health and Quality of Life: 7th International Conference on Human-Animal Interactions, Geneva, September.
  1. Saito, TM, & Okada, et al, 2001, ‘Relationship between keeping a companion animal and instrumental activity of daily living (IADL). A study of Japanese elderly living at home in Satomi Village’, Nippon Koshu Eisei Zasshi, vol. 48, no.1, pp. 47-55.

 

 

 

 

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